Black Lawrence Press

The New Sorrow Is Less Than the Old Sorrow

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from The New Sorrow Is Less Than the Old Sorrow

many, many times I answer to the succinct question how often have you? the rational subjectively. of all lungs that inhale antecedent.  a number of options loiter on counters. sweet, time-bruised plums. not decisions but placeholders. if enough, is not enough, written-out fog, carefully plucked. yes. plucked fog. I dare you. throw water against your heart as if that dragnet of emotions were a cliff. then master it.

Praise

  • Jenny Drai’s The New Sorrow Is Less Than the Old Sorrow is magic. Here the sources of the self (the selves) and the sources of love (loves) open and sing and challenge themselves. This poet renews rituals, this poet renews language.
    —Joseph Lease
  • Jenny Drai’s work asks that the reader “throw water against your heart as if that dragnet of emotions were a cliff. then master it.” Reading these poems is the experience of puzzling with, even throwing oneself against, glass. Each shard is ripe with danger, and yet a whole picture will emerge, deftly and with booming imagination, if you choose to engage with the elements of this language. What I love most about Jenny Drai’s work is her faster-than-light, almost synesthetic switches. Poems that seem to be telling a love story are in fact heralding in a new color of visible light. And, of course, this teaches us what love really is.
    —Emily Kendal Frey
  • Jenny Drai’s The New Sorrow Is Less Than the Old Sorrow is one of those vibrating works that somehow find electrical current to the light bulbs in your memory that have long lost their incandescence. The warmth from those burning pears can warm the dark forgotten corners of your past, but they can also bathe old haunts with cold remembrances. They can even startle you and make you laugh out loud at your own surprise.

    I’ve never read a book of poetry that has so closely resonated with me, and I've never been more convinced that there is a Werther and an old Goethe in us all.
    —Jack Morgan

Jenny Drai

Jenny Drai studied German language and literature as an undergraduate, after which she lived in Munich for several years, working various odd jobs, including Au Pair, English tutor, and cleaning woman.  After her return to the United States, she obtained an MFA in Poetry from Saint Mary's College of California.  She is the author of Letters to Quince (winner of the Deerbird Novella Prize from Artistically Declined Press, 2015) and a full-length collection of poetry, [ the door ], (Trembling Pilllow Press, 2015).  Another chapbook, : Body Wolf :, appeared recently from Horse Less Press.  Her poetry has appeared in numerous online and print journals, including American Letters & Commentary, New American Writing, the Volta, Handsome, and Jellyfish.  She is currently at work on a novel.

Drai © Steven Meredith Author page

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