Black Lawrence Press

Submissions and Contests

Through our annual contests and open reading periods, we seek innovative, electrifying, and thoroughly intoxicating manuscripts that ensnare themselves in our hearts and minds and won’t let go.

SUBMISSIONS CALENDAR

The Big Moose Prize: December 1 – January 31
Open competition, novels

The Hudson Prize: February 1 – March 31
Open competition, poetry and short story collections

The Spring Black River Chapbook Competition: April 1 – May 31
Open competition, poetry and fiction chaps

Open Reading Period 1: June 1 – June 30

The St. Lawrence Book Award: July 1- August 31
First book competition, poetry and short story collections

The Fall Black River Chapbook Competition: September 1 – October 31
Open competition, poetry and fiction chaps

Open Reading Period 2: November 1 – November 30

Black Lawrence Press accepts submissions exclusively through our online submission manager, Submittable. We are not able to accept submissions via email or postal mail. Please see individual contest and open reading period pages for specific guidelines and information.

All manuscripts should include a title page, table of contents, and when appropriate, an acknowledgments page. Manuscripts should be paginated and formatted in an easy-to-read font such as Garamond or Times New Roman. Take note of the length guidelines specified on Submittable for each category. Please include a brief bio or something about yourself in your cover note on Submittable.

Need help with our submissions manager?
Visit http://help.submittable.com

We look forward to reading your work!

Open Reading Periods

Call for Entries

This contest is currently closed for submissions.

Entry Period: June 1 - June 30 and November 1 - November 30

Previous selection

AROMA TRUCE by Terrell Jamal Terry

Previous selection AROMA TRUCE by Terrell Jamal Terry

The poems in Terrell Jamal Terry’s Aroma Truce announce their arrival with language that is both instinctual and inevitable, “the same way as weather,” the speaker tells us in the opening poem. Each poem creates its own stunningly perfect world, yet somehow each of these worlds manages to open up and say something about the one we inhabit. Through this continual unfolding, this is a book for our time, a book of both “frail worry” alongside “stubborn hope,” a book that offers desire alongside what one might hope for others: “I would like goodness & to be good.”

—Adam Clay
An auspicious and powerful debut, never satisfied with the seam between the spiritual and the sensual, the anecdotal and the merely true. “Don’t guess,” Terry admonishes—indeed, every line of these poems feels hard-won from the guesswork of experience and language. “Do I go too far / with this?” Terry asks; “That’s not everything. / Animals & rain. My body, it stings.”

—G.C. Waldrep